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at the present surplus on education reform. this event is about 45 minutes. [applause] first we think you very much for joining us. i know you've had a couple of busy days from last evening jon stewart to this morning cnn.com appears morgan coming and we are delighted to have our wonderful friends here from c-span filming this event that many people across the united states can really benefit from a lot of what michelle has to say. to kickstart the seasoning how did you come up with a fascinating and interesting book and where does this interesting name come from? >> i think the genesis of the name is interesting in that when i first got to d.c., it was the lowest performing and most dysfunctional school district in the entire nation to be the was a pretty widely known truth. and so, i started doing things that i thought were obvious for school district in that kind of state and started closing the low performing schools, moving out and effective employees, cutting the central office board of bureaucracy in half and as i was taking all these steps and measures, people started saying she's a ra
of the education until system. this is a half an hour. >> it's great to see so many people out tonight who do such amazing work for kids in new orleans, and thank you for coming. i'm just going to talk for about 10 or 15 minutes or so and then take questions, and there's some people here tonight who are in the book and they might be willing to answer your questions during that session as well if you're interested in hearing what it was like to be part of that process from their van -- vantage point. the other day is was reading a book called "behind the beautiful forever," which tells the story of a group of families living in a mumbai slum, and in her author's note she tries 0 explain why she chose to focus on ordinary people rather than broader policy debates or history, and she wrote something that i think summarizes what i happened to do and hope against hope getter than i ever could. she wrote, when i settle into a place, listening and watching, i don't try to fool myself that the stories of individuals are themselves arguments. i just believe that better arguments may be even better pol
to send her to college in a day and age when women weren't educated. as frances is growing up, cleveland's relationship with her changes, changes from uncle cleve, the godfather, to a romantic interest. cleveland starts sending her letters with poems and sends her roses, and it's the full court press on courting her. >> you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org. >> you're watching booktv. and now former florida governor jeb bush argues that the nation's immigration policy should be overhauled to reflect our current economic needs, but also should be b clear enough to enforce properly. this is a little under an hour. [applause] >> now, our love whered president finish beloved president ronald reagan passed away almost ten years ago. but as many in this audience know, it seems nearly impossible to follow political news without hearing some reference to our 40th president. his memory, his name and, fortunately, his legacy seem to be ubiquitous as our country grapples with the challenges of our time. for many years, probably starting with the day after president reagan left
care reduction. no, no wants to do that. and no one wants to eat our seed corn. investment in education, investment in infrastructure, investment in sign b scientific research in order to keep narrow loopholes open, reductions if you move the business overseas. no, they don't want to debate that. but now we have a budget. because of the leadership of the chair of the budget committee and the members of her committee -- and, by the way, this is no -- this is not a small group of democrats. it runs from our most liberal members to our most conservative members, all united around the budget that is fiscally responsible. it meets the gramm-rudman -- i mean, i'm on old guy -- the simpson-bowles constraints, budget target. it invests in jobs in the economy, and closes loopholes and preserves the middle class' ability to grow and proceed. so, we now are, you know, in this 30-hour thing. we could actually be debating the budget while those 30 hours tick. we don't have to be sitting here doing nothing. and one of our colleagues said, he'd like to debate the budget two weeks from now. why is he p
the education and i think that they are generally more serious student and demand more from all of us in the classroom. >> host: in our look how to succeed in college, you have a chapter, sub chapter the liberal ivory tower. can a conservative student -- can a student who is conservative be successful, out of harvard, an american? >> guest: absolutely. let's go back and take that turn in the book to dispel the myth. these are not a bastion of liberalism that are unfriendly to conservatives. what we are s after if i'm doing my job right any student who comes in here is going to have his preexisting who views challenged whether they are liberal or conservative those kids are going to be challenged to think about what they really believe in, taken the information that we are leaving and leave with their own view in the world. if i am doing my job right that is what is happening to it and that ought to be both exciting and probably to some extent little frightening to students, no matter what their political selective is because ultimately we want them to be critical consumers of informat
, or the end of men. more women than men get a college education, women are for the first time in the majority in the workplace, in managerial positions. so it's very hard for us to look back to that other time. and i was, you know, even though abstractly understand that things were different, we don't know, um, we we can't really see and feel it exactly. i interviewed janet malcolm for the paris review, and she told me that when she was in college, she had not a single woman professor. and i was just shocked. even though i know that life was like that, it was kind of astonishing to me. so my first question i was going to ask our two panelists who were alive for the feminine mystique to just describe for a moment one, um, your experience when you first read the book, and it is overblown or exaggerated to say that this book changed people's lives? >> oh, i don't think there's any question. i mean, of course, it changed people's lives. it's till changing people's lives. it is passed down true the culture. and it was the greatest social revolution probably since the suffragists. and that movement
so frequently face discrimination in everyday life. in all aspects of their life. from education, employment and health care, to all of their social relationships. as a result it's harder for them to stay healthy, to get health care insurance coverage, and to get the health care they need. here at cap we are leveraging implementation of the affordable care act help eliminate barriers that keep the and transgender people in the with hiv from achieving the highest animal health care needs, health care that they need. in particular, our lgbt stated change project is working in states across the country to support better data collection, better consumer protection, comprehensive and reliable insurance benefits, and a successful implementation of the medicaid expansion. when you look at the affordable care act, you know, those on the right complained that it is a bit of social engineering. and what it really is is trying to ensure that we cover all americans and provide them with good coverage. we should also look at the aca as an opportunity to expand basic rights for the lesbian, ga
he calls the pharmacy. he believes education needs to be cared. a lot of people in lower and higher education are essentially the same thing that we should be spending our first teaching people how to find stuff, how to find information. this is different from knowing things. so if i took all the electricity away and there's a blackout, yet no electricity for weaker to me can ask my students if your devices don't work, what do you know? the answer is they'll tell me not much because i need to be a defined as. studies done by psychologists in which she said if you ask people to do a google search and later you ask them what they found, they're better at remembering how they thought the search path and they are remembering the content. someone if it happens to bless google, i couldn't live without it. what it's doing is redefining what it means to know. if you students raised not just because it ologies, people in education say we should learn how to do things. one should be part of the 21st century generation so we raising a generation of people to believe what matters is you can fin
-- lgbt community. the benefits and what is in play. outreach education and enrollment. you have to inform them of their choices and provide ways to help enroll new coverage where it is available. scaling of the workforce is how we can help with this. how will the care be monitored, and medicaid expansion decisions, health insurance exchanges and ultimately the future of ryan white. i will wrap up now and review of some of these thoughts with what the panel has to say. thank you. [applause] >> thank you, for that thoughtful overview. we are going to move now to our panel discussion. our moderator this morning is the advisor for lgbt policy and racial justice and director of the fire initiative that explores the impact of public policy on gay and transgender people of color. >> good morning, everyone. thank you for providing a great overview for us on how this benefits lgbt people and people living with hiv. includes the principles of universal design. some are marginalized among us and we are helping to work to get a system that works for everyone. we are we're going to talk about what we
a better education than you. and in fact, the reverse is happening. women entering the work force are often better educated, with more academic and trade certifications than men who are doing it. and women are also doing hard and dangerous jobs. we can look to what they do in the military. they can look at how we see them as firefighters and police officers and prison guards. under the legislative i am proposing, no longer will women be on their own and fighting for equal pay or for equal work. in this country, we say work hard and play by the rules, you'll get ahead. we work hard every day but we find that the rules are different for women and for men. actually, the rules in many workplaces are rigged against us. so, mr. president, i would hope that we would pass my amendment today that would allow us to be able to go forward later on in the year and pass paycheck fairness. it is important to the women in the workplace and it's important to our economy. much is being said here about being pro growth. who isn't pro growth? of course we want to grow our economy. and if we look at the tax str
's for cancer or paving roads or education or any other worthy project, there's going to be less money if we don't address the spending problem. particularly if we don't address mandatory spending. and i ask them: have you looked to do what every family has had to do, what every business has had to do during this four years of tepid growth and coming out of this recession, which just seems to linger and linger and linger. 23 million people out of work. have you looked at ways in which you can make your spending and your administration of the budget which you oversee, can you make that more efficient and more effective? are there things you can cut? are there programs you can eliminate that no longer are effective or perhaps shouldn't have been there in the first place? are there things that you would like to do but without the resources, you're not able to do at this time, so you have to set them aside? so if the family is faced with lower revenue or dad is, his job, his salary has been cut or mom has lost her second job or for whatever reason they're having a hard time making payments -- educat
she's tried to influence the education policy and i enjoy talking with her and even more so the older sister who had gone to india to become involved with children who would not have had an education and all the issues related to that. i thought this was interesting and worst doing so i decided the best option was to offer myself to become a nun so at the age of 17 i spoke to the reverend mother to say i decided to become a nun. she said think about it. go away for a year then be will receive you. my parents were very happy with my choice because i honored to be a nun and they're happy to have me another year. they decided nothing was too good for their daughter said they thought they would send me to paris for one year. [laughter] that changed everything. [laughter] i describe that in detail in the book. [laughter] and they came under a different influence. i had a grandfather retired earlier and what he practiced with the pork guy against the landlord and he was pleased to have a young girl who was interested in what he was talking about. he did not know how to speak to a child and
the public education system based on the progressive theories of john dewey. the compatriots' railed against the memorization and that children should read and write and do sums on their own timetable and that was even harmful to force them to do it faster. she believed their emotional development was as important as their intellectual development and she said that most important thing that a school could do is get children into the habit of being happy. most importantly, she believed come and her fellow progressive educators believed that a school must instill in children's minds the ability to think independently so that they could participate fully in the american democracy. in 1932, he elizabeth irwin's class's or at p.s. 41 which most of you probably know is on west 11th street, and it still is in the village. the city at that point withdrew its funding from the experiment and the parents were so upset that their children wouldn't be able to take class with elizabeth warren that they banded together and something that's famous at a parent's ice cream parlor they got together the money o
billion in one year. we spend about $100 billion on education. we spend about $40 billion-plus, a little over, on highways, roads and bridges. that's just an example. we are now surging from 200, 250 in interest to 800 in interest as a result of the accounting that c.b.o. has provided us if we follow this path. it's going to crowd out spending for research. it's going to crowd out spending for children, education, health care and any other program this government wishes to undertake, including defense. mr. president, what kind of time limit might i inquire? is it 30 minutes on this side on this motion? the presiding officer: on the motion, there is one hour equally divided. would the senator like to call up his motion? mr. sessions: my first question would be how much time is left on my half of that hour? the presiding officer: the motion has not yet been called. mr. sessions: well, i would call up the motion, mr. president. the presiding officer: the clerk will report the motion. the clerk: the senator from alabama, mr. sessions, moves to recommit senate concurrent resolution 8 back to
of the and he calls it inform the see that education, he is not alone in this they're saying the same thing that we suspend our efforts teaching people how to find stuff for information on the internet it is different from knowing things. the fight took all the electricity away we have a blackout i said if your devices don't work what do you know, ? they will say not much because i need to be able to find things it is published last year that if you ask people to do a google search than later ask them what they found, there better remembering how they followed the search path they're remembering the contents. so these technologies, plus kugel maybe i could live without it but it is redefining what it means to no. not just because of technology but people in education say we should learn how to use these. we are raising a generation of people to believe it is not what you know, or how you analyze the argument or who you are but that worries me incredibly. >> host: what is your view on the pbs? >> guest: some faculty members say over my dead body to use wikipedia it is a fascinating experime
. and partly because having grown up in new york city as i will tell you with a very inadequate education he was not capable of writing a thank you note. so if his wife was unable to do for him and she would almost everything, if she couldn't do for him he didn't do it because his spelling was phonetic german accent spelling. his handwriting can only be described as horrible. so people often want to know how i came to write about thomas nast and it's a story that originated in gretchen school in california, where i was contributing material for an encyclopedia and produced by my visor, and i chose his name off of a list thinking it would be entertaining. and then my what to look for me to about him i couldn't find any and i thought i'm the world's worst graduate student and they should take me out. i called by pfizer and said i don't know what i'm doing. she said let me look. she looked and she said it's fine, it's not you. there is nothing about him. so it turns out that what existed at that time was a biography published in 1904 by albert bigelow paine who is a newspaper writer for childre
you wen education, weaker in defense, by laying people off in jobs, it makes you weaker because your unemployment rate is higher. it is like looking in the mirror and wishing your weaker. we have to be stronger. can we make cuts? sure we can and we have and we'll make more. but we ought to be focused on being stronger, about growing the economy and growing jobs. and that's why the approach that the senate takes is the right approach. because by utilizing revenues appropriately, reforming tax expenditures to reduce they will on the equivalent of% o 7% or 8a year, thee myriad of tax expenditures in the tax code were able to find cuts. the senate budget in achieving additional deficit reduction is a balanced approach that will make us stronger, not weaker, and that's why it is my great hope that we will pass this in a significant way. i thank the chairman. i thank you, madam president. mrs. murray: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from washington. mrs. murray: i want to thank the senators virginia and hawaii for excellent statements and really laying out the framework
not supporting the party, but they also knew there was no access or very limited access to elite higher education, that there was very little electoral representation, that there was extreme poverty, that there was not representation on the police force or in the political parties, they knew they didn't want the young activists who were standing up and doing something to get kill inside their bed and that that was of a threat to them as well. what the party did was articulate politics that not only drew support from more moderate black politics, but also drew support from other nonblack groups in the united states and internationally, and that support was crucial to being able to sustain on self-defense and the revolutionary imperialism of the black panther party as a source of power for change. i'm going to run through a few sort of examples of some of the allies here. this is, um, the young lords apparently, a puerto rican organization that emulated the black panther party in new york after they took over. they wanted to run a breakfast program and ended up doing a big takeover of a church in t
and opportunity. we want families that are strong, children that are well educated, we want to lift people up from poverty to put the american dream in reach for everybody. our party just can't hire our way forward. it must inspire our way forward. we will do a better job of connecting with people to our principles, showing how we can help every american climb the economic ladder. knowing parents want the best for their children, we'll champion school choice and solutions to lowering the costs of health care. instead of arithmetic, our focus should be on what helps families thrive. we don't want to fix the debt because a balanced budget looks nice, we want to do it because it will help keep money in people's pockets and create more jobs for those who have lost hope. the report minces no words in telling us that we have to be more inclusive. i agree. and as president reagan said, our 80% friend is not our 20% enemy. we can be true to our principles without being disrespectful to those who don't agree with 100% of them. finding common ground with voters will be our top priority. so, first, we're goi
. they also knew that given there was no or very limited access to the higher education there was little representation and there was not representation on the police force of the fire departmendepartmen t or political parties. they knew they didn't want the young activists who were standing up and doing something and that was a threat to them as well. with the party did was articulate politics that not only choose support from more moderate black politics but also choose support from other non-black in the united states and internationally and that outlet support was crucial to be able to sustain self-defense and the anti-imperialism of the black panther party as a source of power for change. i'm going to run through a few examples of some of the allies here. this is the young party of puerto rican organization that emulated the black panther party in new york after they took over. they ended up having to take over a church in their neighborhood. working with many church members because they couldn't get space to run their breakfast program and it ended up that they got a lot of support
on the. another area where people are educated. it can make a difference just like educating people with regards to the deficits were facing and that deficit supposedly help the economy. before i get into this, we both taught at the university of chicago law school. the first time i met him i introduced myself and say you are the kind of guy. as idiotic as silk. and i had no he would help me out with the city of chicago since i'd heard that. they said maybe we can get together for lunch sometime. but he kind of wrinkled his face, turned his back to me and walked away and that was the end of our first conversation. i have to say rinne two and 20 other times and it's pretty much the way all our conversations went. it is not thinking i would be getting christmas cards or anything else from him. i was not as a retired part of it is that got the strong impression when i would run into him that he viewed me as evil because of the gun issue. he had very strong opinions on the. [inaudible] [laughter] i'd found something on the gun issue he disagreed very strongly about and he viewed me as e
were widely denied an education. now, more than eight million students attend afghan schools and more than 40% of them are female. in 2001 afghanistan had 20,000 teachers, all male. today there are 200,000 teachers including 60,000 women. the number of schools in afghanistan has grown from 3400 in 2001 to more than 16,000 today. per capita gdp has grown fourfold since 2001. afghan life expectancy has increased 20 years since then. more than 18 million afghans now have telephone access compared to about one million ten years ago. now these facts do not eliminate the difficulties that we face. they continue insurgency, a neighbor, pakistan that remains a safe haven for insurgents moving across the border. an ineffective and often corrupt central government and other major barriers to stability and to progress. just as it is important for us to be realistic about the challenges that we face in afghanistan, it's also important that we recognize the advances that have an bp made. so that we can reinforce actions that promote success. i just mentioned two here. the first is to continue to w
to focus on education in inner-city is and in fact that's what many of them did in the leader parts of their lives. so, we need to call young people back to service and this sort of great young talent getting out of politics and in doing great work in these other sectors back into the political process to get >> host: how do we do that? how does the political class and the current apparatus attract more young people? is it irrepressible? >> guest: the people going into politics a lot of them are coming through the same sort of career approach rising up through the ranks of running for city council and wanting to -- a young career politician is no better than an old career politician. there needs to be a generational commitment to do this. if you have a group of people to do this than you could make an impact. it's not to be someone like a jim webb who came to congress could make an impact and then sort of checked out and said there isn't a role for one person if you don't have a group or coalition of people coming together to solve problems and that is what this generation needs. as
and have sort of a self-directed education that on some foundational level are really important and that's critical thinking i think the best things my own education gave me. i think it's increasingly hard to sort of live up to that ideal, just with the burdens placed on schools today, surrounding standardized testing, and standardized testing is something i have incredibly milked feelings about. i feel like we need to have a way of measuring school progresses and schools that persistently fail kids over years and generations, need to be held accountable to that. but it also makes it very hard for schools to develop and sustain vibrant art programs and music programs and to kind of have the educational offers that reach the appeal of tie versety of kids out there. i don't envy school administrators for having to figure that all out. does that answer your question? >> if you don't hey -- you don't have any further questions, thank you for the great presentation. [applause] >> in 1978, steven hess surveyed 450 journalists covering the federal government for u.s. news organizations. over 30
educational technology like broadband that our students need to succeed. this plan creates an infrastructure bank to leverage public funds with private investment. it invests in our workers by making sure they have the skills and training they need to move into the 3.6 million jobs businesses across the country are trying to fill. and it is fully paid for by closing loopholes and cutting unfair spending in the tax code that mainly benefits the well off and well connected. our budget also makes sure we are not reducing our fiscal deficit while increasing our deficits in education and skills and infrastructure and innovation. while cutting spending responsibly overall, it protects our investments in national middle class and economic priorities like our schools and our roads and bridges and our clean energy and manufacturing industries. mr. president, this budget puts jobs first and our economy first and foremost, but it also builds on the work we've done over the last two years to tackle our deficit and debt responsibly. you know, in 2010, president obama established the national commission o
the polarized the geological lead as we bring to bear. what did we achieve in education or environmentalism or what's not and in that sense, mayors suggests their accessibility to us but ultimately the real question is army is not in vulnerable to influence? our mayors on the side of big money or not? as compared to what? what in the world system? my view is mayors and councilors and citizens of cities are a great place to start because cds around world remain more cosmopolitan and open and tolerant and floral and more creative than the alternative entities at the state and national level. why not make a bet on them? we bet on the nation's state for 400 years and i am not sure in the 20 first century that that is paying off? lana please democratic that on the city for a while lands see what they can do? is worth making that bet. >> turn it over to the audience. listen. i said that when i had the opportunity. when it is on the ballot by a vote for the parliament of mayors. i went on to say some of the things that could not accomplish, would not accomplish, some of the terrible obstacles the
? and for many, will my schools perform to the ability that my kids can get a great education? it's one of the thing that is' important to be relevant. you see, a couple years ago before i was governor there was a young woman named miss sampson in wisconsin in a community called milwaukee where the milwaukee public schools are some of the most challenged in the country. and this young woman was a first-year teacher who was named the outstanding teacher of the year. she got notice about that, and about a week, week and a half later she got a second notice. do you think what that was? she'd been laid off. you see, under my predecessor, they cut funding for education, but they didn't give them anything in return to make up for them, so what happened? when you have less money in those situations even though she was named one of the best teachers in the state in her profession, what happened to her? she was one of the first to be laid off. why? because under the old system of collective bargaining, one of the last hired is the first fired. one of the great things you may not know about in ou
in education and if they want to get involved, it's completely up to them, students first.org it doing, according to many critics and others, all kinds of interesting work. most importantly, the book -- there's a lady that asked a question. she has two or throw books. the book has received incredible reviews. i you have any stake in education or education means anything to you personally, your kids, your family, the future of the country, they're pointing to many individuals, it's a must-read and i'd strongly recommend. so, in that note, please join in the thanking michelle rhee. [applause] >> up next, after words with guest host jamie weinstein. this week, kim ghattas and her book: the secretary, a journey with hillary clinton from beirut to the heart of american power." she conditions miss clinton's role, and whether u.s. power is in decline. the program is about an hour. >> where we should begin is to talk about your biography. i think as much as this book is about hillary clinton and her time as secretary of state, it's also about your experience from beirut to covering the secret
it features over forty venders and exhibiters, a children educational area, and 5 authorities and -- 45 authors and poets scheduled. booktv will be live from the los angeles times festival of books. checkbook tv.org for live coverage. let us now about your area. we'll post them. post them to our wall or e-mail us. for me something so right, dear, so necessary before we got in trouble as students as young people we studied. we just didn't wake up one morning and said we're going sit in. we didn't just dream one day that we're going to come to washington and go on the freedom ride or march on washington like 1963 we were going march as we did in 1965. we studied. we prepared ourself. >> intimidated so many people white people in particular by using that phrase. black power. because when they use the word or the phrase black power it made many think that black power meant destruction. blowing up the statute liberty or ground zero. destroying america. it wasn't anything about destroying america. it was about rebuilding america and having america to have a new paradigm in terms of
if those people were young today they wouldn't do that. they would focus on education in inner cities and that's what many of them did in the later parts of their lives. so, we need to call young people book to service. we need to call the sort of brain drain of all these great young talent going out of politics and into doing great work in other sectors, back into the political process. >> host: how does the political class and the current apparatus attract more young people? is it irreparable. >> guest: it's very difficult because young people going into politics, a lot of them are coming through the same sort of career approach, rising up through the ranks of running for city council and then wanting to run -- and a young career politician is no better than an old career politician. someone who has amibition in the future. we need people with a sense of service and commitment back in politics. there needs to be a generational commitment to do this, and that's -- this generation needs to realize the importance. if you have a group of people together to do this, then you could make a
stronger. that's what the house republican budget does. it cuts investments in education so our students and workers are less prepared for the jobs of the future. it would undermine our ability to upgrade our roads and bridges and highways and ports, even though our national infrastructure just got a d-plus from the american society of civil engineers. and the house budget would greatly reduce our ability to support research and development, making it so much harder for us to maintain the innovative edge that helps us attract new industries and new businesses to the united states. mr. president, americans want to see a budget that puts the middle class first and asks the wealthiest americans and biggest corporations to do their fair share too as we work towards deficit reduction. so our senate budget locks in tax cuts for the middle class while closing loopholes and cutting wasteful spending in the tax code. and our budget uses that new revenue from the wealthiest americans and big corporations for deficit reduction and for investments that support our economy and strengthen our middle c
much done when they were leaving the committee on health, education, labor and pensions. the 80/20 will means that we agree on 80% of the stuff and we disagreed on 20% of issued we decided to focus on 80% we agreed on, set the other aside to look at another day. that's how they were able to get a lot done. maybe describes what we're doing here. whatever you're doing i think is working, just keep at it. said in a at this next. she stepped out for a moment. we would go to senator heitkamp. if senator -- senator heitkamp, you are recognized. >> thank you so much mr. chairman. and thank you for appearing today. i actually do know janet pretty well, and she's not perfect. tell her i said that. [laughter] we were '80s together. during my time in public life, i've been a tax auditor, tax commission. i've been and attorney general. so this is an area that a think i've kind of two perspectives on but how difficult it is to do security, how difficult it is to wake up every day and realize primarily your mission is to protect this country and to protect people. but the only we can do it is
of world war i, so they thought to make up for the loss and interruption of their education, thegd send them all to university for six months just to round out their education. blackett was sent to cambridge, and he said one day i wandered over to the cavendish laboratory to see what a scientific lahr story was like, and very shortly after that he told the navy i want to become a scientist. he never did receive a ph.d., but he quickly became one of the world's foremost physicists for the work he did in the 1930s discovering the positive terror, the positive electron, the first piece of antimatter whose existence was confirmed. he would win the nobel prize in physics in 1948. he was good looking, had an extraordinary combination of hands-on ability and theoretical imagination. his colleagues remarked they'd never known anyone his equal in his ability to conceive of a problem in physics, write out a few lines of mathematics, design an ap apparatus, build it himse, carry out the experiment, analyze the results. he was also one of a number of scientists in britain and america who had been w
student loans and how our educational system is getting better although we care about those things very much. we care about issues that older americans care about. we care about where we are investing in this country and we care about all these things and politicians have been correctly assessed why that matters. young people who care about deficits and debt issues years ago. they said that was an important issue along time ago. >> host: yeah i'm sure that's true but is it really chew the young people are thinking about entitlement reform and you know long-term tax reform in that kind of thing? >> guest: i think they care about the basic principle behind it. i don't know that people of this generation or anyone are anyone in this country has a detailed plan for how to address these things except some people in congress but i think we understand the principle behind meeting to make decisions and not wanting to be stuck with having to pay this bill down the road. i think that something this generation has been aware of because we have been talking about it for a long time. >> host: and no
to quality education, without basic human rights, he said, civil rights are an empty promise, so in honor of dr. king and all of those who labored to end the old jim crow, i hope we'll commit ourselves to building a human rights movement to end mass incarceration, a movement of education, not inv. cation, a movement for jobs, not jails, a movement to end all these forms of legal discrimination against people, discrimination that denies them basic human rights to work, to shelter, to food. now, what must we do to begin this movement? well, first i believe we got to begin by telling the truth, the whole truth, and admit out loud that we as a nation created a cap-like system in this country. we got to be willing to tell the truth in the schools, in our churches, in our places of worship, behind bars, and in reentry centers. we've got to be willing to tell this truth so that a great awakening to the reality of what has occurred can come to pass because the reality is is that this new cap-like system doesn't come with signs. there are no whites only signs anymore. there are no signs alerting u
than any other time; progressive education, where we've spent more per capita on students but are getting less and less return on the test scores. those aren't my ideas, morals, ideals, and values, that's the other side's. so i'm trying to get them to defend their philosophy and get a controversy and debate going with this book. >> where were you born? >> i was born in washington, d.c. my mother was there at the time, so it was convenient for both of us. >> and what were your parents doing here? >> well, my dad was a very successful salesman. my mom is a homemaker and is still living. he sold business equipment, calculating machines, and move here at the age of 19 from another washington-- washington, indiana, the oldest of nine children. he and all of his brothers were in the army during world war ii and never expected to give birth, to sire a journalist like myself. there was nobody like me in the family, and i thk there are some family members who may be grateful for that. >> and how many brothers and sisters? >> well, i have one brother, a younger brother. >> what's he
, it educates and it moves us. it even angers us and painfully reminds us of all the hatred and injustice so many of our citizens endured at the hands of their fellow countrymen. and today just as i was at their teen years old i'm still an off how these two great men took a chance and risked so much to stand up for literally millions of people. when i look at that photo and after reading dr. carlo' book i'm reminded of the notion that nothing endures more than your character. and the simple yet daunting question of how you want to be remembered. he was one of our host earlier today and summed it up and he said even long after john carlos is physically gone his influence will be very much alive in that iconic photo. nothing could be a more revered legacy. in the case of dr. carlo's he spent only two and a half pages of this entire book describing his actual 200-meter bronze medal race, his enduring character has transcended the memory of that medal for he has so many other things to be proud of. here are just a few of them. his harlem upbringing, his 200-meter world records, being inducted in
was offered social housing and now determined to improve the situation from the education. he will lose fourteen pounds in the tax and three pounds in council tax leaving 11 pounds per week after utility. based on the prime minister's experience of hardship what advice does he have for jordan? >> the point i would make to the honorable lady, first of all, the government is investing in social housing. she'll hear more about that in a moment or two. the second point, when housing benefit costs 23 billion pounds a year, we have to reform it. there's a basic issue of fairness which is why should someone who is living in private rented accommodation not receive a spare room subsidize when someone in social housing should? there's a basic issue of fairness. that's why it should be put right. >> i might be honorable member for -- i'm very proud of our coalition for sticking to -- [inaudible] >> the honorable lay by's question -- lady's question must be heard. >> we set an example for the world and later on this month the prime minister goes to bali to co-chair the high level panel to discuss
from the oil. getting a makerbot is also an education in how things are made in the manufacturing process and in the world around us. >> host: are you the inventer? >> guest: you can blame me.
. getting a makerbot is also educational and how things are made in the manufacturing process and the world around us. >> host: where did you come up with the idea of? >> guest: 3-d printers have been around for 25 years but they were mainframe sized machines that were really expensive. i wanted one, so some friends and i got together and started tinkering. when it worked we quit our jobs and started makerbot so everybody could have one of them. >> host: bre pettis is the founder of makerbot and the ceo of the makerbot corporation out of brooklyn new york. one of the hottest products here on the floor of ces.
,000 per child on public schools and they don't provide an education that allows people to move forward. we need to give parents choices on how to take some of their own money and go to private schools or parochial schools or home school, and give people those opportunities so the competition can provide a better education for people. i think you're quite right that the government has damaged the hopes and opportunities and the ability to move forward of millions of americans. they've got regulations that kill jobs. how many americans could be building the pipeline they wanted to bring down through nebraska, and the government spent four years delaying that. that's tens of thousands of jobs, people could have gotten the first job of their life, stopped by that. we need to do more exploration in alaska and other places. again, tens, hundreds of thousands of jobs. the champber of commerce estimates a million jobs killed by government enact. people need to be treated fair live with the government and that's not happening. >> coming up, congressman steve pierce of new mexico discusses the repub
movement to a human rights movement. the movement for education. a movement for jobs. a movement to end all of these forms of legal discrimination against people. discrimination that denies basic human rights. to work and to shelter. so what can we do to begin this movement? first, we have to begin by telling the truth we have to be willing this new caste like system doesn't come with signs. and there are no signs alerting us to the existence of systems of massive incarceration. prisons are out of sight and out of mind. often hundreds of miles away from communities and families that might otherwise be connected. the people who cycle in and out of these prisons live in segregated and impoverished communities. communities that middle-class folks and upper-middle-class folks rarely come across. so you can live your whole life in america. pull back the curtain and make visible the students in plain sight. so that an awakening can begin. and people can begin to take the kind of creative and constructive action that this moment in our history surely requires people want to escape the system. bein
but people who have more education those of ph.d. tend to be more liberal most of us who are college professors have decided money is not the most important thing because you do other things but that said whenever ideologies if we are doing our jobs our students don't know that the best compliment i ever got was one who had no idea until she babysat my kids is on the bumper sticker on my wife's car because what a good professor does is take his or her background out of the conversation. it isn't about us and our job is to challenge them. >> host: does 10 your help students? >> i hope -- to think it helps the faculty to be successful with that day of the question what does tenure get? freedom of inquiry to look at we think is important without worrying about somebody looking over our shoulder to say that is the unpopular idea if we are worried about that and we would not understand gravity or the world is spherical but that is what tenure gets us or faculty to do a full inquiry to grow the knowledge and science because students could participate in the research projects so if i want m
are informed and are well educated as to what their rights are, um, versus what the rights of either the device maker or the carrier might be, then i think we'll have a better marketplace. so going forward i think we all have a role, so that would be congress, the federal trade commission, the federal communications commission and others in terms of making sure we know exactly what we're talking about here. but we don't want to undermine intellectual property rights, and we want to allow consumers of to have the freedom to contract with those carriers and be able to transfer their devices around once they own the device. they'll own the device, but they won't necessarily own the copyright material and the license to it. >> and, in fact, the white house made it clear they support unlocking of devices when you're not under c. they're not -- under contract. they're not saying go out and get the contract and unlock your device the next day -- >> guest: exactly. and that's an important point. >> yeah, and i think that's messed. the idea is to prevent unlocking once the contract is finished. if i und
to contract. if consumers are informed and well educated to what their rights are, versus the rights of the device maker or carrier might be, then i think we'll have a better marketplace. going forward, i think we all have a role, that would be congress, federal trade commission, federal communications commissions, and others in terms of making sure we know exactly what we are talking about here, but we don't want to undermind the property rights and allow consumers to have the freedoms to contract with those carriers and be able to transfer their devices around once they own the device. they own the device, but not the copy right, but not all the intellectual property or the licenses to it. >> smart, the white house put out a statement a couple weeks ago saying they support unlocking of devices when you are not under contract. they don't say get your carrier contract and unlock the device the next day and walk from the contract. >> guest: exactly. a very important point. >> i think that's missed in the debate. unlock any time. well, no, if you have a considerate, that's a subsidy fo
in the provider education to ensure what the department has available is forthcoming. i do think this is a conversation ongoing and partners on this panel have resources available to all services. >> as many organizations that do competency training and in many cases have partnered with the federal government and has tripled in size since the affordable care act at hhs has been interested in making sure those young starting out providers have the opportunity to get cultural competency training. many trainers do that in various parts of the country. another major resources the joint commission. my parents are health care providers, so why not all about sometimes a little bit of attention between the standards set out and how providers feel they are actually equipped to meet the standards. when the commission establishes new standards that could nondiscrimination on the basis of orientation identity started a project to make cultural competency materials were widely available so clinicians thought that they have the tools to make that change. there's a monograph from the joint comm
, with a saudi family. the parents have been educated in the u.s., and they took me on a picnic out in the desert. and at the end of the evening, the family was praying the final prayer of the day. and i was sitting on a rug, and at the end of that, their six-year-old son came to me and he said, i need to teach you something. and i said, sure. and he said, do you know what to say when the angel of death comes? and he could tell i did not. so he proceeded, and he said, he says, who is your god? and you say allah. and then he says who is your profit? and you said mohammed. what is your faith? and you say islam. what are your works? and you said i heard an ugly. and muslims apparently believe that this great interview occurs immediate after you're buried, and if you been a good muslim and properly answer these questions, you are born aloft and shown a window on heaven, and then go back in your grave to await judgment day. and if you have not been a good muslim and cannot properly answer these questions, you are pulverized and put back together and pulverized and put back together for eternity, until
with these people in different cultures and subcultures with the education, it helped to crystallize the concept of winter political change from the nationalists to international perspective for i saw the struggle at home. and rather vilifying white men began to criticize the space structure of rich white men. a change that proved invaluable and then as the war organizer later on. >> this is the big take away that the participants have. the opportunity to interact with folks that they did not have a chance to normally such as the appalachian whites they got them thinking and more sophisticated ways and a lot of people went to washington were relatively young teenagers and their 20s or 30s. there were older folks there but it was a majority of people who went to washington who stayed there for any period of time were younger. they had more time and did not have this kind of thinking form to through life yet the more important is the relationship between the chicano activists saying a great take away for them they got to meet people from the southwest even less angeles saying when when i have gott
if you'll give us a certain number of advantages, muse leanny, if you make education in the italian schools catholic, if you'll treat catholicism as the state religion of italy, then we'll set up a concordance with you, and you'll give us the status of a separate country. the van can is a separate country. it doesn't have any normal citizens, you know, no women citizens. it's got post offices and other signs of the government, but it's a fake government. it's a fantasy government. you know, it's kind of a disneyland government. [laughter] nobodiments to take -- nobody wants to take it away. my wife refused to go to the vatican after the first few times. it's got beautiful treasures in there, but it's a great fortress is great treasures inside, and everywhere, paintings of the donation of con stan tine, the mystical giving of worldly power to the pope, painting on chairs of the bishop peter, which he never was, coats of arms of all of the noble popes who took over in the renaissance, and she said, you know, what could be more against the gospel of jesus than this earthly trumpeting o
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